“Trained Immunity: a memory for the innate immune responses”

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Jan. 26, 2017 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Address
Davis Conference Center
2nd Floor – Seminar Room B

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Speakers
  • Mihai G. Netea, PhD
  • Department of Internal Medicine
  • Radboud University Medical Center
  • Nijmegen, The Netherlands
RSVP

Abstract: The inability of innate immunity to build an immunological memory, considered one of the main characteristics differentiating it from adaptive immunity, has been recently challenged by studies in plants, invertebrates, and mammals. The increasing evidence for immunological memory within innate immunity is the focus of intense investigation. Long-term reprogramming of innate immunity, that induces adaptive traits and has been termed “trained immunity,” characterizes prototypical innate immune cells such as natural killer cells and monocytes, and provides protection against reinfection in a T/B-cell-independent manner. Both specific signaling mechanisms and non-specific epigenetic effects have been implicated in mediating these effects: the role of epigenetic changes and of metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis will be discussed. This concept represents a paradigm change in immunity and its putative role in resistance to reinfection may represent the next step in the design of future vaccines.

ADDRESS

  • Address: Leon and Norma Hess Center for Science and Medicine 1470 Madison Avenue (between 101st and 102nd St) TMII - 1st Floor New York,
    NY 10029
  • Email: TMII@mssm.edu
  • Website: tmii.mssm.edu
  • Tel: (212) 824-8471
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