“Exploring gastrointestinal physiology with Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Where are we now and what’s happening next”

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Sept. 6, 2018 from 11 a.m. to noon

Address
TMII Large Conference Room 117 – 1st Floor
Hess Center for Science & Medicine
1470 Madison Avenue, New York, NY

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Speakers
  • Alex Menys, PhD
  • CEO, Motilent Ltd - London, England
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Abstract: The purpose of this talk is to provide a state of the art overview of how MRI is being used to help understand the human digestive tract in health and disease. Beginning with Crohn’s Disease, compelling data has been published that supports the role of intestinal motility being a powerful and sensitive biomarker to inflammatory activity. Motility improves rapidly where a patient responds to medication and through image analysis methods it is possible to quantify this change providing a fast, objective and pragmatic means of adding to the clinical picture. Crohn’s has opened the door for advanced imaging of the gut in the modern gastroenterology clinic. What lies ahead of us is undoubtedly more complex but also exciting from a technical and clinical perspective. Common conditions like constipation have a simple clinical outcome but recent studies with MRI have revealed that many patients have strong contractile activity albeit in the wrong direction unlikely to be helped by pro-kinetics. In the stomach, data has been generated suggesting that peristalsis may in fact be a confounder for symptom severity in functional dyspepsia with surrogates for accommodation being better predictors of therapeutic response. Are so many drugs failing here because they’re focused on the wrong mechanism? While this data must be carefully considered and repeated, paradoxical observations are being made with MRI across a range of GI problems common in every clinic. There are more scanners than ever, the technology is well developed and funding for tackling high cost, chronic conditions in gastroenterology both from industry and the state appears plentiful. Whether your background is technical, clinical or somewhere in-between now is a great time to get involved in developing our understanding of the digestive tract with MRI and this talk should provide a good starting point.

ADDRESS

  • Address: Leon and Norma Hess Center for Science and Medicine 1470 Madison Avenue (between 101st and 102nd St) TMII - 1st Floor New York,
    NY 10029
  • Email: TMII@mssm.edu
  • Website: tmii.mssm.edu
  • Tel: (212) 824-8471
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